The Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board (TSSWCB) was created in 1939, by the Texas Legislature to organize the state into soil conservation districts (now known as soil and water conservation districts) where there was a need expressed by local landowners. The TSSWCB was also designed to serve as the state-level administrative agency for local soil and water conservation districts (SWCDs) once the districts were organized.

Today, there are 216 SWCDs organized across the state. Each district is an independent political subdivision of state government that is governed by five directors elected by landowners in the district. The TSSWCB provides assistance to the districts through field representatives that meet regularly with districts, through TSSWCB regional offices and through programs administered by the TSSWCB.

"Our mission is working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, and plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people" U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Mission Statement

The Arlington Ecological Services Field Office (ARLES) provides assistance to Federal and State agencies, local governments, businesses, and the general public relative to conserving, protecting, and restoring habitat for a variety of Federal trust resources, including migratory birds and federally threatened and endangered species.  Our assistance is typically provided through five programs: education/outreach, endangered species, environmental contaminants, federal permits and projects, and Partners for Fish and Wildlife.  

Eisenhower State Park, with 463.1 acres, is located in Grayson County, northwest of Denison on the shores of Lake Texoma.

Activities: Some of the activities include picnicking, hiking, biking, nature study, fishing, boating and boat rentals, water skiing, swimming, wildlife observation, ATV and mini bike use (OHV permit required), and a variety of camping.

Tours/Programs: Nature/environmental programs are frequently scheduled throughout the year and upon special request with enough lead time. There is a small amphitheater available for group use.

Situated along the shores of a 30,000-acre reservoir Ray Roberts Lake State Park Complex consists of two state park units (Isle du Bois and Johnson Branch), six satellite parks (Jordan Unit, Pond Creek, Pecan Creek, Buck Creek, Sanger, and Elm Fork), Wildlife Management Areas, wetlands, waterfowl sanctuaries and the 20 mile Ray Roberts Lake/Lake Lewisville Greenbelt Corridor. Birdwatching, water sports, riding horses or backpacking along a scenic trail, Ray Roberts has something for everyone.

The Texas Outdoor Family program is designed to teach you and your family the basic outdoor skills you need to enjoy a great overnight camping experience.

Texas Outdoor Family (TOF) workshops are hosted at state parks where your family receives hands-on experience learning basic outdoor skills. You will learn everything you need to create great memories enjoying the outdoors with your family, including:

  • How to set up and break down camp (including your tent)
  • Fire starting
  • Outdoor cooking
  • Guided walks
  • Nature activities
  • How to use a GPS
  • Geocaching
  • Introductions to a wide range of outdoor activities (such as fishing, kayaking, wildlife watching) depending on the site location, facilities and the season of the year

Best of all, no experience is necessary and you get all the help and advice you need from highly skilled outdoor specialists and trained volunteers!

Activities: Activities include camping; lake swimming (unsupervised); fishing; boating (no skiing/tubing, or jet skis permitted); rock climbing (climbers and rappelers must check in at headquarters); mountain biking; equestrian camping, horseback riding (visitors must provide their own horses); and hiking. Note: Trails may be closed during wet weather. Climbing is prohibited when the rock formations are wet (Call the park to verify climbing area is open, if it has rained in the last 48 hours of your planed arrival.) More information on the Lake Mineral Wells State Trailway.

The Tri County Wildlife Management Association is a group of private citizens joined together to manage their property for the benefit of wildlife. The map on website shows the "official" boundary set by the association. It is given to help you locate the area. Note that some members' property may be outside this boundary, and the boundary may change over time. For further details, including membership, please contact them directly, using the contact information given here:

Ray Windham
(214) 534-1450
[email protected]

Texas Forest Service provides statewide leadership to assure the state's trees, forests and related natural resources are protected and sustained for the benefit of all.

Texas Forest Service was created in 1915 by the 34th Legislature as an integral part of The Texas A&M University System. It is mandated by law to "assume direction of all forest interests and all matters pertaining to forestry within the jurisdiction of the state."

Texas Forest Service provides statewide leadership to assure the state's trees, forests and related natural resources are protected and sustained for the benefit of all.

Texas Forest Service was created in 1915 by the 34th Legislature as an integral part of The Texas A&M University System. It is mandated by law to "assume direction of all forest interests and all matters pertaining to forestry within the jurisdiction of the state."

Texas AgriLife Extension Service offers practical, how-to education based on university research. It’s available to any resident of Texas. You may read it in the newspaper, hear it on the radio, attend an Extension workshop, order a publication, or just call your county Extension office!

The AgriLife Center in Dallas is a gateway to science and public outreach for the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex. Working through two Texas A&M System agencies - Texas AgriLife Research and Texas AgriLife Extension Service - the Center produces science-based research, technologies and educational programs to help urban clientele manage and conserve natural resources.

Research and education programs at the AgriLife Center at Dallas resolve issues that include the biology, management, utility, adaptability, genetic improvement and pest problems of plants used in Texas landscapes; water conservation and management; energy conservation; and issues related to the diverse green industry.

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